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Tuesday, 18 June 2019 18:24

Is Flossing That Important?

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Flossing Should be a Part of You Daily Routine

If you ask most people how they feel about flossing, you are likely to be greeted with answers that are less than favorable. It seems that across the board, most people don’t enjoy flossing and even fewer people actually take the time to floss on a weekly, let alone daily, basis. Why is flossing such a tough sell for people? Mostly because it is time-consuming and can also lead to some uncomfortable feelings in the gums afterward. Despite the reluctance of the average person when it comes to flossing, we wanted to take some time in today’s blog post to go over the many reasons that flossing is one of the most important things a person can do in order to maintain good oral hygiene and reduce that amount of problems associated with bad oral health. Keep reading below to learn more!

What are the Facts?

In a world where it’s hard to believe anything that we are told at face value, many people may be wondering if flossing is actually worth it. After all, people tend to brush their teeth every day; shouldn’t that be enough? While brushing your teeth is an important component in maintaining good oral health, it is only the basest of activities that need to be completed in order to make sure that your pearly whites stay healthy. You see, brushing is great but it really only tackles the problems that are on the most easily accessible areas of a person’s teeth. Bacteria in the mouth are adept at finding nooks and crannies that are hard to reach, allowing them to take root and enjoy the plethora of sugars that find their way into our mouths every single day. When you floss, you are reaching areas of your mouth that a toothbrush just simply can’t. Cleaning out the areas in between teeth is one of the best ways to fight plaque build-up, which can lead to all sorts of nasty things, and improve the overall health of your mouth.

What Happens When You Don’t Floss?

We can tell you all day about the benefits of flossing but we also want you to understand what can happen if you choose not to floss on a regular basis. When you don’t floss, you are at risk for two major dental issues: gingivitis and cavities between your teeth. Gingivitis is a common and mild form of gum disease that presents itself as irritation, redness, and swelling of the gum area that surrounds the base of a person’s teeth. If ignored, gingivitis can lead to a much more serious gum disease known as periodontitis and, eventually, tooth loss. In addition to gingivitis, people who do not floss are more likely to get cavities in between their teeth. If you have ever had a cavity, you know that they are not fun to deal with. A cavity in between the teeth is even worse. While flossing will not completely eliminate the risk of gingivitis and cavities, it goes a long way in protecting your mouth from these uncomfortable and potentially harmful oral maladies.

How Often Should a Person Floss?

Ideally, a person would floss every single day. However, as dental professionals, we know that this does not always happen. Flossing at least once every few days, in addition to brushing your teeth at least twice a day, can go a long way in making sure that your mouth stays as healthy as possible. We’ve found that many people find it easier to get into a flossing routine if they purchase disposable, one-time-use flossers. These tools are easier to use than traditional dental floss and can be kept in a small container directly on the bathroom sink. If you’re looking to incorporate a flossing regimen into your daily oral hygiene routine, we suggest that you floss every time that you brush. Even though it takes a few extra minutes, we promise that the health benefits will be worth it.

If you have any more questions about oral hygiene or you need to schedule an appointment to have your teeth cleaned, please reach out to us at Tedford Family Dentistry today and schedule an appointment. We have been serving patients in the Ooltewah area for years and we would love to help you make sure that your mouth stays as healthy as humanly possible.

Read 366 times Last modified on Thursday, 29 August 2019 19:25